AHA/ACC Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease (2010)

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Commentary by Reed E. Pyeritz, MD, PhD

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Bicuspid aortic valve

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Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital abnormality affecting the aortic valve and aorta and is found in 1% to 2% of the population. Nine percent of patients have family members who also have bicuspid aortic valves.1

Recommendations for Management

CLASS I
  1. First-degree relatives of patients with a bicuspid aortic valve, premature onset of thoracic aortic disease with minimal risk factors, and/or a familial form of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection should be evaluated for the presence of a bicuspid aortic valve and asymptomatic thoracic aortic disease. (LOE: C)
  2. All patients with a bicuspid aortic valve should have both the aortic root and ascending thoracic aorta evaluated for evidence of aortic dilatation. (LOE: B)
 

1 Hiratzka LF, Bakris GL, Beckman JA, et al. 2010 ACCF/AHA/AATS/ACR/ASA/SCA/SCAI/SIR/STS/SVM Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients With Thoracic Aortic Disease: Executive Summary. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010;55(14):1509-1544. doi:10.1016/j.jacc.2010.02.010.